Nanomedicine: Self-assembled biomaterials as next-generation therapeutics



Molecular Design in Nanomedicine                              


My lab’s central theme is to harness the potential of self-assembled or polymeric nanomaterials as ‘next-generation biomaterials’ in the field of translational research to solve unmet biomedical needs.

More about my research vision and our lab philosophy can be read here: An interview with Praveen Vemula by  Anusha

The application of nanotechnology to drug delivery widely expected to change the landscape of pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries and orientation of translational research for the foreseeable future. The pipelines of pharmaceutical companies believed to be drying up in many cases, and a number of blockbuster drugs will come off patent in the near-term. The development of nanotechnology products would play an important role in adding a new armamentarium of therapeutics to the pipelines of pharmaceutical companies while contributing paradigm-changing science to the translational research.

My lab utilizes nanotechnology as a basic tool, and by combining with clinical research, we aim to achieve an improved delivery of drugs, genes or cells as next-generation therapeutic strategies. 


Inflammation, a primary defence system, also an inherent part of most diseases. It plays varient roles in different diseases, thus  developing inflammation-resposive biomaterials could be a paradigm shift in the treatment/management of diseases. This is particularly huge leap for the treatment of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases.


My lab is focused on developing therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory diseases:

At present we are developing therapeutics for multiple diseases -


Inflammation-responsive drug delivery platform will be utilized for:

- To prevent rejection episodes in organ transplantation.

- Sepsis

- Arthritis

- Psoriasis

- Ulcerative Colitis

- Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Collaborators

 

Here is the list of my wonderful collaborators who is a great source of learning.

- Robert Rieben : University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland

- Esther Vogelin : University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland

- Jeff Karp : Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA

- Chenjie Xu : Nanyang Technogical University, Singapore

- Venkatakrishna Rao Jala : University of Louisville, USA

- Jayandharan Rao : Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India
- Sivapriya Kirubakaran : Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India

- Dasaradhi Palakodeti : InStem, India

- Srikala Raghavan : InStem, India

- Colin Jamora : InStem, India

- Shravanti Rampalli-Deshpande : InStem, India

- Ramkumar Sambasivan : InStem, India

- A. S. Sahul Hameed : C. Abdul Hakeem College, India



Concepts


    

Self-assembled prodrugs - A new paradigm in drug delivery

      

Self-assembled prodrugs - A new paradigm in drug delivery

      

        
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